Customer reviews are the "social proof" that encourages people to join in on something. It's one thing for you to tell people to sign up for a campaign, but it's another thing for your happiest customers to say it too. Publish your best reviews from communities like Yelp right to your website. This adds genuine value to your landing pages when people are on the fence about submitting their contact information. 
Now if there isn’t anything out there like this….its a huge miss!! Maintaining a company’s website press coverage is a time consuming, mindless job really….all you are doing is taking an abstract from an article someone else wrote about your organization (Newspapers/magazines/television/blogs etc), and creating a link for the reader to read the original article. But however time consuming the job is, it is important to keep the information current, relative, and timely for a lot of reasons and for a nonprofit could mean the difference between getting further press coverage or not.
Digital marketing builds trust with users. You can use social proof like testimonials from previous customers on your website or star ratings in order to show shoppers what others think of your products. Patagonia displays their ratings for every product on their website and breaks it down by stars. As you can see they have 64 five star ratings on this product. Since all of these reviews are accessible to the shopper they can browse and read through all of them if they want. This is something you just can’t do with traditional marketing or even in-store shopping. It would be immensely difficult to show 60+ reviews in a magazine for your product.
For content marketing, and actually any kind of marketing and pr works great social listening. (I use and recommend to try Brand24.net it is quite nice and gives reliable scores) You have instant access to all mentions across the web, stats, reach, sentiment, influencers. You can use it for searching influencers, getting news from your niche, check opinions etc. Definitely worth to try!
People like more choices, so consider creating subscription levels that let people sign up to receive content that’s relevant to them. For example, if you sell widgets and tax advice, provide three options on your opt-in form that allow users to sign up to receive info about widgets, info about tax advice or both. Further customize by allowing them to designate how frequently they’d like to hear from you — weekly, monthly or only when something really special is going on. People may be more likely to sign up for your email list if they have some control over the content they’ll receive.

Instead, I’m talking about timed pop-up ads, or onsite retargeting. After a user spends a certain amount of time on your page, she can receive a pop-up relevant to the content on that page, or to her behavior. Examples include exit pop-ups, which appear when a user tries to leave the page, or scroll pop-ups, which appear after the user scrolls a certain percentage down the page.
This post reminds me of when I used to do marketing dance clubs and bars. Often time the owners of the bars had no idea about owning a bar, they were self employed contractors with a skill that made them alot of money. Most times than not, their Bar or Club venture did not. In marketing their venture they would take a shot gun approach and try and advertise it as everything to everyone! So every night of the week they had a special thing. I would say look you are a contractor and you do plumbing right. You don’t do carpentry or lay carpet. No would be the answer but I could! (They are always the entrepeneur.) I would say thats fine, but would you advertise that you are the best carpenter in the land and everyone should call you Joe the Plumber over Joe the carpenter? No would be the reply! If you are going to go into a new venture be it entertainment mogul or house building pick one aspect of that business and do that well. Don’t be the everything to everybody!
Vocus is a leading cloud-based marketing software which helps with customer acquisition and retention by making it easier for marketers to reach out via social media and other online media channels.  Vocus offers a comprehensive suite of tools which integrate social media marketing, search marketing, email marketing as well as effective PR. Vocus reported 2012 revenue of $170.8 million, a 49% increase from the previous year.
This is a process described by Seth Godin known as permission marketing. The core concept of this idea is that you never market to someone that doesn’t want it, you first have to ask them for their permission. When someone signs up to your email not only do they become a warm lead but they give you their permission to send them offers and to market to them.
The concept is simple. If someone is reading an in-depth blog post of yours, chances are they’re very interested in what you have to say on the topic. The key is to then offer them something that is directly related to the topic they’re reading about. You know they’re already interested, so by offering instantaneous extra value it’s not difficult to see why people would gladly sign up.
When you meet people face to face for any reason, ask for their business card. Offer yours. Set a glass bowl on the counter in your store or the reception desk in your office, and ask visitors to drop their cards in it. Offer some incentive to do so — a free product or service, gift card, etc. Use your own business cards to further drum up emails; add an offer on the back of your card that encourages people to sign up to receive your emails.
This is a process described by Seth Godin known as permission marketing. The core concept of this idea is that you never market to someone that doesn’t want it, you first have to ask them for their permission. When someone signs up to your email not only do they become a warm lead but they give you their permission to send them offers and to market to them.

You don’t have to worry about Google or Facebook suddenly changing their algorithms, because once you have someone’s email you have the ability to communicate with them one on one. Even if all of Foundr’s search rankings and social media presence disappeared tomorrow, we’d still be able to promote our brand and our products to the thousands of people on our mailing list.
For starters you can attract highly targeted traffic by creating a custom audience when using digital marketing. This proves difficult with traditional media. You can put an ad in a specific magazine that your target audience reads but how many people will actually purchase that magazine or even see your ad? Or let’s say your business wants to advertise on a  billboard. A bunch of eyes will see your ad but will they take action? Chances are your ad won’t apply to every person that sees it.

Modern business success tends to rely heavily on the Internet. If you want your business to reach its highest degree of potential, you have to focus on the digital realm. It’s critical to set up social media platforms for your business. It’s also critical to establish a reliable and user-friendly official website. Your aim should be to try to get access to the members of your target audience. Below, QASymphony shares numerous online marketing tips that can help you get on the right path quickly and easily.
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